Federal judge steps in to stop A.G. Barr from dropping Michael Flynn case right now

Federal Judge Emmet G. Sullivan on Tuesday threw Washington for quite a ride when he suddenly announced an unpredictable and rare move that's uncommonly seen in courtrooms. He said he was halting the Department of Justice's decision to drop its case against former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn right away - and is allowing outside third parties to submit amicus briefs to be reviewed first.

You can bet that former President Obama and members of his administration's Justice Department will be taking full advantage of this offer. President Obama himself even spoke up about Flynn's dismissal on Saturday, characterizing it as a major miscarriage of justice.

"There is no precedent that anybody can find for somebody who has been charged with perjury just getting off scot-free,” Obama said.

There's simply no telling what could happen to Flynn at this point, but you can bet that this move could create even more fireworks between the Obama and Trump camps. Trump over the weekend went on a tirade accusing Obama of "OBAMAGATE!" after he made his displeasure known.

This is a breaking news story and could be updated.

Here's the full text of the minute order:

Given the current posture of this case, the Court anticipates that individuals and organizations will seek leave of the Court to file amicus curiae briefs pursuant to Local Civil Rule 7(o). There is no analogous rule in the Local Criminal Rules, but “[the Local Civil] Rules govern all proceedings in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.”

LCvR 1.1. “An amicus curiae, defined as friend of the court,… does not represent the parties but participates only for the benefit of the Court.” United States v. Microsoft Corp., No. 98-cv-1232(CKK), 2002 WL 319366, at *2 (D.D.C. Feb. 28, 2002) (internal quotation marks omitted). Thus, “[i]t is solely within the court’s discretion to determine the fact, extent, and manner of the participation.” Jin v. Ministry of State Sec., 557 F. Supp. 2d 131, 136 (D.D.C. 2008) (citation and internal quotation marks omitted).

“‘An amicus brief should normally be allowed when a party is not represented competently or is not represented at all, when the amicus has an interest in some other case that may be affected by the decision in the present case (though not enough affected to entitle the amicus to intervene and become a party in the present case), or when the amicus has unique information or perspective that can help the court beyond the help that the lawyers for the parties are able to provide. Otherwise, leave to file an amicus curiae brief should be denied.'” Id. at 137 (quoting Ryan v. Commodity Futures Trading Comm’n, 125 F.3d 1062, 1064 (7th Cir. 1997)); see also LCvR 7(o).

Although there is no corollary in the Local Criminal Rules to Local Civil Rule 7(o), a person or entity may seek leave of the Court to file an amicus curiae brief in a criminal case. See Min. Order, United States v. Simmons, No. 18-cr-344 (EGS) (D.D.C. May 5, 2020); cf. United States v. Fokker Servs. B.V., 818 F.3d 733, 740 (D.C. Cir. 2016) (appointing amicus curiae in a criminal case).

As Judge Amy Berman Jackson has observed, “while there may be individuals with an interest in this matter, a criminal proceeding is not a free for all.” Min. Order, United States v. Stone, No. 19-cr-18 (ABJ) (D.D.C. Feb. 28, 2019). Accordingly, at the appropriate time, the Court will enter a Scheduling Order governing the submission of any amicus curiae briefs. Signed by Judge Emmet G. Sullivan on 5/12/2020. (lcegs3) (Entered: 05/12/2020)